Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Straight From the Mouth of Robert J. Dornan, author of 23 MINUTES PAST 2 A.M.


Robert J Dornan is someone who wishes to leave a better world to his children. He realizes that the odds are slim but he will do whatever he can to increase the probability of success.  He is always open to discuss new and innovative ideas and hopes someday to see the building of a functional solar city as well as a fair and community-driven compensation system.

Robert’s latest book is the historical fiction, 23 Minutes Past 1 A.M.
For More Information
About the Book:

In the early morning of her sister's wedding day, Mila Kharmalov stared in stunned silence at the coloured sparks streaming from Reactor Four of the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant.  At that very moment, her life and the lives of everyone she knew changed forever.

Years later and on another continent, Adam Byrd was writing biographies for everyday people looking to leave their legacy in book form. When the woman he loved phoned from Kiev offering him the chance to write the story of a lifetime, he jumped at the opportunity not realizing that his voyage would be a bumpy ride through a nations dark underbelly. With the help of his friend's quirky cousin, Adam is nudged into a fascinating adventure of love, greed, power and psychotic revenge, culminating with a shocking finale.

23 Minutes Past 1 A.M. is a work of fiction based on factual events from Chernobyl and villages throughout Ukraine.

For More Information

  • 23 Minutes Past 1 A.M. is available at Amazon..
  • Discuss this book at PUYB Virtual Book Club at Goodreads.

Thanks for letting us interrogate interview you!  Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?
I thought it would be a great way to meet women.  I was so wrong.

Kidding.

A couple of reasons and neither have anything to do with the voices in my head. When my children were born I wanted to leave them some kind of legacy that they could look back on; something they could tell friends about and eventually, their own children.  Secondly, I’m a closet radical and I have a lot I wish to say.  The best medium to share my opinion is with an attentive audience that doesn’t include rope or duct tape.

Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be?  I mean what are the perks and what are the demands? 

I’m not quite sure what any author is expecting once they begin their foray into writing.  There is the romantic notion of earning a living from writing books but for most of us, that dream is nonsense and approaching delusional. 

The best perk is any kind of critical acclaim and I’m proud to say I’ve achieved that from several readers. As for demands, they’re minimal at the worst of times.  I do everything at my own pace so pressure (other than work life) is nonexistent.  The book is ready when I say it is. (Psst…that was me being forceful. Pretty cool, eh?)

Which route did you take – traditional or self-published – and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like?
I went the self-pub route because I’m age handicapped (that means old btw). I don’t expect a publisher to take a huge leap of faith on someone who is happy just to wake up in the morning.  Besides, I hop from one genre to another like a keyboard gigolo and that’s unacceptable to most serious Publishing Houses. 

Contrary to what some Internet articles write – and we should believe whatever we read on the Internet – self-publishing is not an easy alternative.  23 Minutes Past 1 A.M. took four years to arrive at final product.  Editing alone was close to five months.  Self-publishing can be tedious, maddening and downright flustering but – take a deep breath – it’s worth it.  I have total control and can make revisions if I want to at any time.  I can remove it from Amazon or wherever with a few simple keystrokes.  I don’t have to share any residuals with anyone except the taxman and my ex-wife.  That’s kind of nice in a dysfunctional way.

What’s the snarkiest thing you can say about the publishing industry?
The publishing industry is like a gold star on your homework except you have to pay for it and you don’t get to choose where the gold star will go.

As I mentioned earlier, getting published by an established Publishing House is a romantic notion and, let’s not kid ourselves, it’s a badge of honor.  Unfortunately, unless you’re Stephen King, you can forget the hefty advance payment and expect a much less attractive payday and a heavier workload than anticipated.  There is too much competition to keep Publishing Houses profitable enough to offer what was presented a decade ago.  Someday, months after you signed the contract, your book will be edited, bought or predetermined reviews will be written (ok, not always the case) and a clearinghouse with a computerized press will create just enough first edition books to be sent to retail chain warehouses.  Once the book is ready for delivery, you will end up doing the vast majority of marketing and for your efforts you will see a smaller portion of the residuals than say…some hack like me. More importantly, you no longer have control of your book.  Get used to that. Oh, and most people would rather buy the E-book anyway.

But you can tell friends and family that you were published.  Snarky enough?

Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?
My family as a group are somewhat aloof and don’t really care what I do or where I go.  I could tell them I’ve been in a Mexican prison for the last ten years and they wouldn’t bat an eye.

My children are always excited to see a new book and now that my daughter is over eighteen she can read 23 Minutes Past 1 A.M., which she is now doing and loving it.  She looks at me differently than before (and from a safe distance) but she loves the book.

What was the craziest or insane thing that happened to you in the book publishing process?
Oh, that’s something I wish I could forget but for the sake of redemption, let’s just say, lesson learned.  I guess most authors are proud of their books and want to tell the world whatever way they can.  Once the realization that not everyone is interested in your book sets in and your friends have blocked you on every social media site, “novelist novices” begin their journey to the unknown.  I joined a site that exchanged Facebook Likes.  Yep…I sold my soul for a “please like me”.   I can’t believe how silly this was and how desperate/naive I had to be to engage in something so trivial.  Three years later and I still only have ten likes.  What the hell? 

How about the social networks?  Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?

Good question.  I’m not really in love with Twitter.  I kind of toe the line between introvert and extrovert and Twitter – to me - just seems inane for anyone who isn’t Barack Obama or Batman.

Instagram is kind of cool if you’re younger than the food in my fridge.

Pinterest is great for cat pics, recipes and amateur porn.  Not my cup of green tea.

That basically leaves Facebook and although I don’t frequent FB too often, as far as book enthusiasts and having a place to chat with readers is concerned, it’s the best place to hang out.  Word of warning: No cat videos allowed in my profile

Book sales.  Don’t you just love them (or lack of?)?  How are you making the sales happen for you?

I beg a lot.  A bit of groveling, tears and promises to do laundry.  I also have marketing people doing their thing.  I’m here chatting with your readers, which has been a blast btw.  My take on marketing is that I’m a clump of coal and these guys will somehow turn me into a shinier clump of coal.  Shiny enough to convince readers that 23 Minutes Past 1 A.M. is a gem. 

What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?
I’d scream out loud that although 23 Minutes Past 1 A.M. may at times be weird and gory, it is a fantastic read that will teach you a lot about Chernobyl and the lifelong effects it had on the residents living in and around the reactor.  It really is a gripping story.  Buy it today and support my hair growth initiatives.

Okay, too much sugar for you today!  Here’s a nice cup of Chamomile tea and come on over and sit under the cabana and watch the waves roll in.  Now…can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above doesn’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?

Can I get some coconut water instead?

It’s a rush to see your book on Amazon or wherever and you’re absolutely right…the pain is forgotten as soon as someone purchases the first book.  I received email on Saturday from a lady outside of Kansas City who thoroughly enjoyed 23 Minutes Past 1 A.M.  Seriously, how cool is that? 

Also, if your book gains any measurable amount of success you can leverage that to discuss other projects such as alternative energy and vertical farms in a third world country.  That’s a plug by the way.  If you wish to contact me, please do at jackcityguy@gmail.com.  Thank-you!!!

Straight From the Mouth of Robert J. Dornan, author of '23 Minutes Past 1 A.M.'



Robert J Dornan is someone who wishes to leave a better world to his children. He realizes that the odds are slim but he will do whatever he can to increase the probability of success.  He is always open to discuss new and innovative ideas and hopes someday to see the building of a functional solar city as well as a fair and community-driven compensation system.

Robert’s latest book is the historical fiction, 23 Minutes Past 1 A.M.

For More Information
About the Book:

In the early morning of her sister's wedding day, Mila Kharmalov stared in stunned silence at the coloured sparks streaming from Reactor Four of the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant.  At that very moment, her life and the lives of everyone she knew changed forever.

Years later and on another continent, Adam Byrd was writing biographies for everyday people looking to leave their legacy in book form. When the woman he loved phoned from Kiev offering him the chance to write the story of a lifetime, he jumped at the opportunity not realizing that his voyage would be a bumpy ride through a nations dark underbelly. With the help of his friend's quirky cousin, Adam is nudged into a fascinating adventure of love, greed, power and psychotic revenge, culminating with a shocking finale.

23 Minutes Past 1 A.M. is a work of fiction based on factual events from Chernobyl and villages throughout Ukraine.

For More Information

  • 23 Minutes Past 1 A.M. is available at Amazon..
  • Discuss this book at PUYB Virtual Book Club at Goodreads.

Thanks for letting us interrogate you!  Can you give us a go-for-the-gut answer as to why you wanted to be an author?

I thought it would be a great way to meet women.  I was so wrong.

Kidding.

A couple of reasons and neither have anything to do with the voices in my head. When my children were born I wanted to leave them some kind of legacy that they could look back on; something they could tell friends about and eventually, their own children.  Secondly, I’m a closet radical and I have a lot I wish to say.  The best medium to share my opinion is with an attentive audience that doesn’t include rope or duct tape.

Tell us (we won’t tell promise!) is it all it’s cracked up to be?  I mean what are the perks and what are the demands? 

I’m not quite sure what any author is expecting once they begin their foray into writing.  There is the romantic notion of earning a living from writing books but for most of us, that dream is nonsense and approaching delusional. 

The best perk is any kind of critical acclaim and I’m proud to say I’ve achieved that from several readers. As for demands, they’re minimal at the worst of times.  I do everything at my own pace so pressure (other than work life) is nonexistent.  The book is ready when I say it is. (Psst…that was me being forceful. Pretty cool, eh?)

Which route did you take – traditional or self-published – and can you give us the nitty gritty low down on what’s that like?

I went the self-pub route because I’m age handicapped (that means old btw). I don’t expect a publisher to take a huge leap of faith on someone who is happy just to wake up in the morning.  Besides, I hop from one genre to another like a keyboard gigolo and that’s unacceptable to most serious Publishing Houses. 

Contrary to what some Internet articles write – and we should believe whatever we read on the Internet – self-publishing is not an easy alternative.  23 Minutes Past 1 A.M. took four years to arrive at final product.  Editing alone was close to five months.  Self-publishing can be tedious, maddening and downright flustering but – take a deep breath – it’s worth it.  I have total control and can make revisions if I want to at any time.  I can remove it from Amazon or wherever with a few simple keystrokes.  I don’t have to share any residuals with anyone except the taxman and my ex-wife.  That’s kind of nice in a dysfunctional way.

What’s the snarkiest thing you can say about the publishing industry?

The publishing industry is like a gold star on your homework except you have to pay for it and you don’t get to choose where the gold star will go.

As I mentioned earlier, getting published by an established Publishing House is a romantic notion and, let’s not kid ourselves, it’s a badge of honor.  Unfortunately, unless you’re Stephen King, you can forget the hefty advance payment and expect a much less attractive payday and a heavier workload than anticipated.  There is too much competition to keep Publishing Houses profitable enough to offer what was presented a decade ago.  Someday, months after you signed the contract, your book will be edited, bought or predetermined reviews will be written (ok, not always the case) and a clearinghouse with a computerized press will create just enough first edition books to be sent to retail chain warehouses.  Once the book is ready for delivery, you will end up doing the vast majority of marketing and for your efforts you will see a smaller portion of the residuals than say…some hack like me. More importantly, you no longer have control of your book.  Get used to that. Oh, and most people would rather buy the E-book anyway.

But you can tell friends and family that you were published.  Snarky enough?

Tell us for real what your family feels about you spending so much time getting your book written, polished, edited, formatted, published, what have you?

My family as a group are somewhat aloof and don’t really care what I do or where I go.  I could tell them I’ve been in a Mexican prison for the last ten years and they wouldn’t bat an eye.

My children are always excited to see a new book and now that my daughter is over eighteen she can read 23 Minutes Past 1 A.M., which she is now doing and loving it.  She looks at me differently than before (and from a safe distance) but she loves the book.

What was the craziest or insane thing that happened to you in the book publishing process?

Oh, that’s something I wish I could forget but for the sake of redemption, let’s just say, lesson learned.  I guess most authors are proud of their books and want to tell the world whatever way they can.  Once the realization that not everyone is interested in your book sets in and your friends have blocked you on every social media site, “novelist novices” begin their journey to the unknown.  I joined a site that exchanged Facebook Likes.  Yep…I sold my soul for a “please like me”.   I can’t believe how silly this was and how desperate/naive I had to be to engage in something so trivial.  Three years later and I still only have ten likes.  What the hell? 

How about the social networks?  Which ones do you believe help and which ones do you wish you could avoid?

Good question.  I’m not really in love with Twitter.  I kind of toe the line between introvert and extrovert and Twitter – to me - just seems inane for anyone who isn’t Barack Obama or Batman.

Instagram is kind of cool if you’re younger than the food in my fridge.

Pinterest is great for cat pics, recipes and amateur porn.  Not my cup of green tea.

That basically leaves Facebook and although I don’t frequent FB too often, as far as book enthusiasts and having a place to chat with readers is concerned, it’s the best place to hang out.  Word of warning: No cat videos allowed in my profile

Book sales.  Don’t you just love them (or lack of?)?  How are you making the sales happen for you?

I beg a lot.  A bit of groveling, tears and promises to do laundry.  I also have marketing people doing their thing.  I’m here chatting with your readers, which has been a blast btw.  My take on marketing is that I’m a clump of coal and these guys will somehow turn me into a shinier clump of coal.  Shiny enough to convince readers that 23 Minutes Past 1 A.M. is a gem. 

What is one thing you’d like to jump on the rooftop and scream about?

I’d scream out loud that although 23 Minutes Past 1 A.M. may at times be weird and gory, it is a fantastic read that will teach you a lot about Chernobyl and the lifelong effects it had on the residents living in and around the reactor.  It really is a gripping story.  Buy it today and support my hair growth initiatives.

Okay, too much sugar for you today!  Here’s a nice cup of Chamomile tea and come on over and sit under the cabana and watch the waves roll in.  Now…can you tell us what you love about being a published author and how all those things above doesn’t matter because it’s all part of the whole scheme of things and you wouldn’t have it any other way?

Can I get some coconut water instead?

It’s a rush to see your book on Amazon or wherever and you’re absolutely right…the pain is forgotten as soon as someone purchases the first book.  I received email on Saturday from a lady outside of Kansas City who thoroughly enjoyed 23 Minutes Past 1 A.M.  Seriously, how cool is that? 

Also, if your book gains any measurable amount of success you can leverage that to discuss other projects such as alternative energy and vertical farms in a third world country.  That’s a plug by the way.  If you wish to contact me, please do at jackcityguy@gmail.com.  Thank-you!!!

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Straight from the Mouth of Nonfiction Author Robert Wideman

"Publishing is a Nightmare" 


         Six years ago I decided I wanted to write a book about my experience in North Vietnam as a Prisoner of War. I did this because I wanted something on paper for my two sons and six grandchildren. Four years later I had only written 100 pages. At 71 years of age, I realized I might not live long enough to finish my book. I decided I needed help in writing and publishing a book, so I contacted Graham Communications in Denver, Colorado. Mark Graham introduced me to Cara Lopez Lee. Cara finished my book in two years and did a great job.

         Now it was time to create and publish my book. Colin Graham at Graham Publishing Group published my book. He designed the front and back covers as well as the interior for the paperback and kindle editions. He did a very nice job as well.

Then it came time to distribute my book. We started with IngramSpark. What a disaster? Amazon took 55% of the retail price off the top. The printer (Ingramspark?)  then charged $6.44 for each copy. That left me 74 cents per book as profit. That was a 5% profit for each book. I thought that was outrageous, because you typically receive a10% profit from traditional publishers. The whole idea of self-publishing is to make more than the 10% received from traditional publishers.

         When I started this journey friends told me that they went to traditional publishers but did not make any money. They self published and did much better. Mark Graham said if I went to a traditional publisher they would ask me for a marketing plan. I would respond, “Yes, where is my marketing plan. You guys get 90% of the profit.” They will then say, “You don’t understand. Where is your marketing plan?” Someone told me that a marketing plane would cost $30,000. Mark said that it will cost $5.00 to print each book, and I can sell each book for $15.00. That is true if you buy the books at wholesale and then sell them on your own. However, if you go thru Amazon or Barnes and Noble, they get 55% off the top and that takes your profit. Kindle is better. With Kindle, I receive 60% of the retail price.

         I replaced Ingramspark with Createspace, and now I receive $4.25 for each book sold on Amazon. Createspce only deals with Amazon, however, so I had to keep IngrahamSpark for Barnes and Noble and all the other retail outlets.

         I learned that the publishing industry is designed for the benefit of printers, distributors, and book publishers. The publishing business is definitely not set up for the benefit of authors.

 ////////////////////////////////////////////




 Title: UNEXPECTED PRISONER: Memoir of a Vietnam Prisoner of War
Genre: Memoir
Author: Robert Wideman
Websitewww.robertwideman.com        
Publisher: Graham Publishing Group
Find on Amazon

About the Book:  

When Unexpected Prisoner opens, it’s May 6, 1967 and 23-year-old Lieutenant Robert Wideman is flying a Navy A-4 Skyhawk over Vietnam.  At 23, Wideman had already served three and a half years in the Navy—and was only 27 combat days away from heading home to America. But on that cloudless day in May, on a routine bombing run, Wideman’s plane crashed and he fell into enemy hands. Captured and held for six years as a Prisoner of War in Vietnam, Wideman endured the kind of pain that makes people question humanity.  Physical torture, however, was not the biggest challenge he was forced to withstand.  In his candid memoir, Unexpected Prisoner, Wideman details the raw, unvarnished tale of how he came to understand the truth behind Jean-Paul Sartre’s words: “Hell is other people.”

A gripping, first-person account that chronicles the six-year period Wideman spent in captivity as a POW, Unexpected Prisoner plunges readers deep into the heart of one of the most protracted, deadliest conflicts in American history:  the Vietnam War. Wideman, along with acclaimed memoirist Cara Lopez Lee, has crafted a story that is exquisitely engaging, richly detailed, and wholly captivating.  Unexpectedly candid and vibrantly vivid, this moving memoir chronicles a POW’s struggle with enemies and comrades, Vietnamese interrogators and American commanders, lost dreams, and ultimately, himself.

With its eye-opening look at a soldier’s life before, during and after captivity, Unexpected Prisoner presents a uniquely human perspective on war and on conflicts both external and internal. An exceptional story exceptionally well-told, Unexpected Prisoner is a powerful, poignant, often provocative tale about struggle, survival, hope, and redemption.


About the Author:  

Robert Wideman was born in Montreal, grew up in East Aurora, New York, and has dual U.S./Canadian citizenship. During the Vietnam War, he flew 134 missions for the U.S. Navy and spent six years as a prisoner of war. Wideman earned a master’s degree in finance from the Naval Postgraduate School. After retiring from the Navy, he graduated from the University of Florida College of Law, practiced law in Florida and Mississippi, and became a flight instructor. Robert Wideman holds a commercial pilot’s license with an instrument rating, belongs to Veterans Plaza of Northern Colorado, and lives in Ft. Collins near his two sons and six grandchildren.

Connect with the author on the web: Facebook / Twitter / LinkedIn



Wednesday, October 26, 2016

The Darkness Between by Jesse Teller, author of Chaste

 

Inside the Book:

Title: Chaste Author: Jesse Teller
Release Date: October 5, 2016
Publisher: Amazon Digital
Genre: Dark Fantasy/Horror
Format: Ebook/Paperback

  When her devout parents died, Cheryl turned her back on her god. Years of denial and self-loathing have defeated her. Her life consists of taking orders and succumbing to abuse. A group of strangers stops in Chaste for the night, but an unnamed threat is preying on the town. Tragic deaths have become more and more frequent. Cheryl wants to protect these travelers, expose the evil force, and save her fellow citizens, but she must find a way to believe in hope.
 
The Darkness Between

In 2010, I dedicated myself to writing books. I wrote every day. Well, five times a week, and I got in the habit. You can get in the habit of anything—anything. I got in the habit of creating. At the time, I had dedicated myself to rough drafts. I was trying to teach myself how to write a story, how to master novels. So, I wrote new material every day. The ideas kept coming, and I kept writing.
It must have been three years later when it started getting out of hand. The work swelled and became more than I wanted. It came to life. It started to breathe, and it began chewing, little bites at first, gnawing at my sanity.
I was in between books. I had just written Eleacont and was taking a break. My breaks are usually two weeks long, but the next book was going to be the third in a series. It would continue a tale I had written 1,600 pages of. So, for reasons you can probably understand, I read those two books first.
Well, it takes a while to read 1,600 pages. I had taken two weeks off already, and then reading took another three. About two weeks into the reading, the work stomped its foot and roared.
At about 2 a.m., I was walking from my office to the bathroom when I saw smoke. With a sleeping wife and two kids in the house, my heart exploded into a sprint. The fear in my skin ripped at me, breaking out into sores of terror as I grabbed the door to the stairs and rushed. When I reached the living room, I froze and nearly screamed. It was not my house burning down. It was a character.
A character I had burned at the stake stood atop a stack of wood in my living room, burning. I could smell her flesh searing. She bucked and arched her back, fighting to get away from the flames mercilessly engulfing her. I stood in my living room, staring at the horror of my book now in my life.
I looked away. I had to. I am ashamed of having done it. I always told myself I would not flinch at the horrible things that happen in my work. But this time, I did. I looked away in grief and fear. When I looked back, she was gone.
Staggering, I went back downstairs to my office. I was spent, exhausted by the emotional turmoil. I told my wife the next day. She looked at me with no reaction whatsoever. About five minutes later, she asked, “Did she say anything?” I told her she hadn’t, and she nodded. We talked about it for a while but came to no conclusions.
The next night, I heard the soft cry of my youngest and I went to soothe him back to sleep. I opened his door and, in the corner, out of reach of the straining light, stood a creature. It was shaped like a short man, a kid even. It held a shadow that looked like a weapon. I stepped between my son and the figure, my terror almost crippling, and I fought to speak, to grab my son and run, to fight, maybe, anything. But I couldn’t. Fear had locked me up. When the shadow stepped into the light, it was worse than I could imagine. I stood before Aaron the Marked, a damaged, uber-violent character on the verge of psychopath. He snarled at me and my blood ran like ice. I could not bear his gaze. His snarl had unmanned me. When I looked away and then back at him, he was gone.
My son stopped crying immediately.
For days, they came. They found me everywhere I went. I saw them on the street. I saw them in the back seat of my car. They all looked angry. They looked as if they had decided they would take me back.
My only guess was that they had come to drag me back to work. I read those two books as fast as I could. When I started writing again, they were gone, a whiff of smoke on the breeze the only sign I had not been making it all up.
When I take a break, they show up. Two weeks they give me, then they come get me. They haunt my house. They sulk near my children. They leave puddles of blood in my office. They stare, stalk, and threaten me, until they scare me from the world of rationale and drag me back to their world.
I am a hostage of my own world, a dedicated slave to the realm I created and the characters that people it.

In January, I’ll sit down to write the sixth and seventh books in that series. Before I can, I have to read over 3,100 pages to remind myself of everything happening in the story. During that time, they will come for me. I can’t escape them.

Meet the Author:

brick2-sq
Jesse Teller fell in love with fantasy when he was five years old and played his first game of Dungeons & Dragons. The game gave him the ability to create stories and characters from a young age. He started consuming fantasy in every form and, by nine, was obsessed with the genre. As a young adult, he knew he wanted to make his life about fantasy. From exploring the relationship between man and woman, to studying the qualities of a leader or a tyrant, Jesse Teller uses his stories and settings to study real-world themes and issues.

———————

Tour Schedule

Monday, October 10 -Book featured at The Review From Here
Tuesday, October 11 -Guest blogging at Literal Exposure
Thursday, October 13 - Book featured at As the Pages Turns
Friday, October 14 - Guest blogging at Lover of Literature
________
Monday, October 17 - Book featured at CBY Book Club
Tuesday, October 18 - Guest blogging at A Title Wave
Thursday, October 20 -Interviewed at Voodoo Princess
Friday, October 21 - Guest blogging at From Paperback to Leatherbound
________
Monday, October 24 - Book featured at The Writer's Life
Tuesday, October 25 - Book featured at All Inclusive Retort
Wednesday, October 26 - Guest blogging at Straight From the Author's Mouth
Thursday, October 27 - Book featured The Bookworm Lodge
Friday, October 28 - Guest blogging at The Dark Phantom
________
Monday, October 31 - Book featured at Bound 2 Escape
Wednesday, November 2 - The Literary Nook
Thursday, November 3 - Book reviewed at A Room Without Books is Empty
Friday, November 4 - Book reviewed at I'm Shelf-ish
________